Washing your face with regular soap isn't enough to make acne better. The best face wash for acne is effective at removing oil and dirt, but still gentle enough to use regularly without overdrying your skin. Look for topical acne medication ingredients salicylic acid and/or benzoyl peroxide in your face wash and use gentle, nonabrasive cleansing techniques.
Azelaic acid has been shown to be effective for mild to moderate acne when applied topically at a 20% concentration.[66][129] Treatment twice daily for six months is necessary, and is as effective as topical benzoyl peroxide 5%, isotretinoin 0.05%, and erythromycin 2%.[130] Azelaic acid is thought to be an effective acne treatment due to its ability to reduce skin cell accumulation in the follicle, and its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.[66] It has a slight skin-lightening effect due to its ability to inhibit melanin synthesis, and is therefore useful in treating of individuals with acne who are also affected by postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.[1] Azelaic acid may cause skin irritation but is otherwise very safe.[131] It is less effective and more expensive than retinoids.[1]
Not only can the sun prolong PIE appearance, it can lead to premature aging including sun spots, fine lines, and wrinkles. UV damage is DNA damage. Sunscreen is an anti-aging must for all ages young and old--preventing future skin cancer. It is the fountain of youth in a bottle. Prevention is better than treatment. There is no such thing as safe tanning, as tanning is the result of sun damage.
Below is a summary of the categories of data that we process, the purposes of processing the data and on what legal basis we are processing your data. Our processing of your personal data partly depends on whether you have subscribed for membership with us or not. The processing of personal data relating to customers that are not members is described in section 3.2 below. The processing of our members’ personal data is described in section 3.3 below.
Acne, also known as acne vulgaris, is a long-term skin disease that occurs when hair follicles are clogged with dead skin cells and oil from the skin.[10] It is characterized by blackheads or whiteheads, pimples, oily skin, and possible scarring.[1][2][11] It primarily affects areas of the skin with a relatively high number of oil glands, including the face, upper part of the chest, and back.[12] The resulting appearance can lead to anxiety, reduced self-esteem and, in extreme cases, depression or thoughts of suicide.[3][4]
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Acne vulgaris is diagnosed based on a medical professional's clinical judgment.[15] The evaluation of a person with suspected acne should include taking a detailed medical history about a family history of acne, a review of medications taken, signs or symptoms of excessive production of androgen hormones, cortisol, and growth hormone.[15] Comedones (blackheads and whiteheads) must be present to diagnose acne. In their absence, an appearance similar to that of acne would suggest a different skin disorder.[28] Microcomedones (the precursor to blackheads and whiteheads) are not visible to the naked eye when inspecting the skin and can only be seen with a microscope.[28] There are many features that may indicate a person's acne vulgaris is sensitive to hormonal influences. Historical and physical clues that may suggest hormone-sensitive acne include onset between ages 20 and 30; worsening the week before a woman's period; acne lesions predominantly over the jawline and chin; and inflammatory/nodular acne lesions.[1]

When you sign up for membership (online or in Acne Studios’ physical stores), Acne Studios collects your name, address, e-mail address, telephone number, country of residence, date of birth, title (Ms./Mr. or other title) and social media account contact details. Acne Studios processes the data to create your personal account and to process the membership which includes certain features such as (i) sending digital receipts upon request when purchasing a product in a physical store, (ii) sending out invitations to special events/promotions, (iii) personalized services in store, and (iv) profiled marketing offers through email, SMS, letters, telephone, WeChat, Whatsapp and other social media. The legal basis is that the processing is necessary in order for us to be able to fulfill our contractual obligations to you under the Membership Policy. We will retain your data for as long as necessary for this purpose.
Contrary to the marketing promises of “blemish banishers” and “zit zappers,” immediate results are not the trademark of acne treatments — a frustrating truth to anyone suffering through a breakout. And while pimples are personal (your stress-induced spots will look and act differently than your best friend’s breakout), the best acne treatments will include a regimen of products to hit all of acne’s root causes. We tested 43 kits to find the most well-rounded breakout-fighting solutions on the market.
The membership is valid worldwide in our own physical stores and online. The membership is not valid in our franchise stores which we currently have in Shanghai, Tokyo, Hong Kong and Amsterdam. The membership is neither valid in our Department Stores, which we currently have at Åhléns City Stockholm, Nordiska Kompaniet Stockholm, Galeries Lafayette Paris and Harrods London.
1. Topical Treatment: This refers to acne medications which are applied directly onto the skin, such as creams, gels, serums and ointments. Topical treatments can be found over-the-counter (OTC) or at a pharmacy when prescribed by a doctor. If you’re shopping for topical treatment solutions, look for products that contain acne-fighting ingredients such as salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide, and glycolic acid that can penetrate pores to loosen and dissolve debris. Topical solutions are generally best suited to treat mild to moderate acne. 2. Systematic Treatment: Systemic acne medications are consumed orally, such as antibiotics or hormone pills, and work from the inside out to help clear your complexion. Antibiotics can help kill the bacteria lodged within infected pores to reduce inflammation, redness and swelling. Hormones pills such as birth control are frequently used to regulate androgen levels and treat hormonal acne. You won’t be able to purchase systemic treatments OTC and will need a doctor’s recommendation for these medications. 
Use oil-free makeup. If you wear makeup, you may be stuck in a vicious cycle of covering up acne while simultaneously causing it with your cover-up usage. Find acne-fighting oil-free mineral makeup to help prevent worsening your acne while simply trying to hide it. Power foundations are also recommended. When possible, avoid wearing make-up at all though as it clogs your pores over the course of the day.
Antibiotics. These work by killing excess skin bacteria and reducing redness. For the first few months of treatment, you may use both a retinoid and an antibiotic, with the antibiotic applied in the morning and the retinoid in the evening. The antibiotics are often combined with benzoyl peroxide to reduce the likelihood of developing antibiotic resistance. Examples include clindamycin with benzoyl peroxide (Benzaclin, Duac, Acanya) and erythromycin with benzoyl peroxide (Benzamycin). Topical antibiotics alone aren't recommended.
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